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Wizard World hall #1By Kristy Stevenson; photos courtesy of Wizard World

The 2015 Wizard World Comic Con is coming to Raleigh! Great news for East Coast fans of pop culture’s movies, graphic novels, cosplay, comics, television, sci-fi, toys, video gaming, original art, collectibles, contests and more. Read on for 10 reasons to attend this amazing event at the Raleigh Convention Center:

1. Three days of comic con fun, right here in the capital city: Fri., Mar. 13, 3-8pm; Sat., Mar. 14, 10am-7pm; Sun., Mar. 15, 11am-5pm. Spend the weekend with us!

2. Celebrities! From meet and greets and Q&A panels. This year’s lineup features David Tennant (Doctor Who); William Shatner (Star Trek); Ian Somerhalder (Vampire Diaries, LOST); Tyler Hoechlin (Teen Wolf); Liam McIntyre (Spartacus: War of the Damned); WWE® Diva Eva Marie™; John Schneider (Smallville, The Dukes of Hazzard); Cassandra Peterson (Elvira: Mistress of the Dark); Lou Ferrigno (The Incredible Hulk); and The Walking Dead’s Sonequa Martin-Green and Sarah Wayne Callies. Check out the Wizard World Comic Con Raleigh website for the complete and most up-to-date list.

3toSee3. Hard to find, exclusive products and collectibles will be available on the convention floor, as well as new products from trending brands. You can order your own customized lightsaber from Ultra Sabers for your favorite Star Wars: Episode VII enthusiast. And fans looking for unique souvenirs should make the Convention Exclusive booth their first stop!

4. Something for every age and generation. Embrace your inner Creative Genius and bring the whole family.

5. Comic books, comic books and more comic books–and some of the most creative comic artists and writers on the planet.

Comic book fun for all ages6. Visit the Back to the Future DeLorean. Don’t miss your chance to sit in front of the flux capacitor and functional time circuit displays while helping to raise funds and awareness for the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

7. Cosplay with costume contests for both adults and kids. Interact and get social with those who love the same pop culture icons you do.

8. Conversations, photo ops and autographs with your favorite celebs, artists and creators, as well as cosplay and fan communities. Watch artists at work.

Watch artists at work!9. Tip: if you want both a photo and autograph, sign up for the photo slot first so the celeb can autograph your pic. Slots can be reserved online with a credit card or with cash at the venue.

10. Freebies: all one-day and three-day general admission attendees will receive a limited edition, exclusive cover variant of The Walking Dead #1 by Dean Haspiel. All VIP attendees will receive two limited edition, exclusive cover variants of The Walking Dead #1–a regular cover and sketch black and white version by Haspiel. The artist will be on-site to sign; autograph fees may apply and quantities are limited. Plus, a zombie sketch for the first 150 kids (16 and under) on Sun., Kids Day, by “Zombie King” Arthur Zuydam.

You don’t want to miss this!

Follow Kristy on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, or visit her website here: Kristy Stevenson Creative.

Marbles Kids Museum in Raleigh NCBy Kristy Stevenson

There’s no “Shhhh,” or “Don’t touch,” at this museum! Delivering purposeful play in a big way, Marbles Kids Museum is an interactive experience in downtown Raleigh with themed exhibits for kids ages 10 and under. The setup allows children to imagine, discover and learn through daily educational programs, special events and giant-screen IMAX films. Through core initiatives and rotating exhibits, the museum is never the same place twice! Kids are excited to learn through play, and there’s something for the whole family. Here are the nine exhibits your little ones can explore:

Kid Grid
Powerful play at work; this is an energy exhibit where kids are in charge. So energize your electricity smarts and take charge to power a bright future.

Marbles Kids Museum in Raleigh NCAround Town
Exploring a pint-size version of a community–bringing a child’s world down to size–where kids take charge with opportunities to imagine and explore how people work, live and play together. Includes Speed Zone; Let’s Fight Fire; Get Well; Peek-a-boo Bay; On The Farm; My Market; Let’s Eat; Act I; All Aboard!; Pet Vet; Exploration Station; Backstage Studio; Ready, Set, School; and News Around Town.

Check out Around Town’s new fire truck coming Feb. 28th. Visitors may remember that the current truck is one of the last remaining pieces from the museum’s merger with Playspace. Marbles is excited to unveil the new vehicle.

Splash!
Discovering the power and fun of water, both indoors and out, this is overflowing with hands-on experiences and experiments. Includes The Lighthouse; Hideaway Grove; Under the Waves; Science Submarine; The Blue Marble; Castaway Cove Kids Garden; and Power Flower.

The popular Kids Garden will be undergoing a transformation; look for new fruits and vegetables soon.

Marbles Kids Museum in Raleigh NCIdeaWorks
Dream, Design, Do! Your child’s imagination takes center stage as kids design, create and build structures, vehicles, simple machines and everyday products. Includes Go Zone; Super Structures; Work Bench; Studio Style; and Toddler Tools.

Art Loft
Encouraging free expression and creativity through painting, drawing, sculpting and exploring different types of artwork. Includes Exploring Fine Art Techniques; and Displaying Your Work.

Marbles Kids Museum in Raleigh NCBB&T Toddlers Hollow
A special place where little ones under the age of three are invited to discover the magic of the woods and explore at their own pace. A great place to practice crawling, walking and balancing on the meandering bridge; uncovering a pixie hideaway; or dressing up as a favorite forest critter.

Moneypalooza
Bringing to life the importance of establishing healthy money habits through innovative and high-energy activities. Kids play with smart ways to spend and save while having a wealth of fun learning to earn. Includes Pay Day; Banker Ben & Betty’s Money Movers; and Freddie Frugal’s Spending Smarts.

Power2Play
Providing play environments that promote physical activity and healthy choices for kids and families. Includes Center Ice; Workout Zone; Little Leaguers; Healthy Kitchen; Tumble ‘n Twirl; and Center Court.

STEMosphere
Hands-on play with colorful learning about science, technology, engineering and math. Includes brain teasers, science challenges, puzzles, math games and more.

Family fun (it’s our go-to spot on particularly hot or inclement weather days), and makes a great field trip or birthday party!

Follow Kristy on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, or visit her website here: Kristy Stevenson Creative.

By Kristy Stevenson; video courtesy of the Town of Wake Forest

Mardi Gras is French for “Fat Tuesday,” reflecting the carnival-like practice of the last night of eating richer, fatty foods. It begins on or after the Epiphany, or King’s Day, culminating on the day before Ash Wednesday, or the beginning of fasting for Lent. Popular practices include wearing masks and costumes, overturning social conventions, dancing, sports competitions and parades. And here are three ways you can celebrate in Greater Raleigh:

Mardi Gras Street Festival in Wake Forest
Wake Forest
will host the Mardi Gras Street Festival on Sat., Feb. 14. For both adults and children, the event invites visitors to the heart of downtown Wake Forest for music and entertainment, face painting and a walking parade. Teens and adults can participate in the King & Queen costume contest prior to the start of the parade. Judging will take place at noon and winners will serve as grand marshals and lead the walking parade. A Prince & Princess costume contest will also be offered for younger participants, as well as Best Baby, the ever-popular Bubblegum Blowing contest and more.

Fat Tuesday on Fayetteville St.
For a Mardi Gras party all day long, check out Feb. 17th’s Fat Tuesday on Fayetteville St. in downtown Raleigh. The party starts at noon and will feature live music on an outdoor stage from 5-10pm, street performers, artisans and food trucks. Then check out The Big Easy for authentic, soul-satisfying Cajun and Creole recipes, plus bona fide zydeco and traditional New Orleans jazz from 8:30pm-2am.

Mardi Gras Masquerade Ball
Join the revelry of the Mardi Gras Masquerade Ball to Benefit Education and raise funds for educational programs in the process. Celebrate in Cary on Feb. 14, 7-11pm, with your best semi-formal or costume attire and enjoy a three-course meal of traditional New Orleans recipes with unlimited beverages, live music and a dance floor. VIP packages available.

Know of any other celebrations in Greater Raleigh? Submit them here!

Follow Kristy on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, or visit her website here: Kristy Stevenson Creative.

Wake Forest Historical Museum in Wake Forest NCBy Kristy Stevenson

The Wake Forest Historical Museum, on North Main St. in Greater Raleigh’s Wake Forest, is adjacent to the Calvin Jones House and provides an innovative look at the history of a quaint town, its college and subsequent university.

Calvin Jones was a physician, founder of the N.C. Medical Society and mayor of Raleigh who moved to northern Wake County around 1820, purchasing the farmhouse on 615 acres of land and calling what had previously been known as the Forest District: Wake Forest. The two-story Greek Revival house is the birthplace of Wake Forest College (now Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C.) and the town’s oldest dwelling. Here he saw patients, performed surgeries and even established the area’s first post office. Dr. Jones was the first to use “Wake Forest” as an address on a letter sent through the U.S. mail.

Wake Forest Historical Museum in Wake Forest NCThe property was sold in 1832 to the N.C. Baptist Convention, which was seeking a suitable location to educate young ministers by way of a manual labor institute. By 1834, students as young as 12 could work the land in exchange for a religious education. Under the guidance of first president Samuel Wait, the college began to develop a flourishing student body (eliminating the farm chores), advanced curriculum including Schools of Law and Medicine and a new brick campus. The college even transitioned to co-ed during the war.

Wake Forest was born as a college town populated with shops, pharmacies, restaurants, department stores, pool halls and movie theaters. For more than a century, the town and the college grew up together. It acquired new residents, businesses and even a railroad.

Wake Forest Historical Museum in Wake Forest NCThe Wake Forest Historical Museum depicts it as “five towns in one” back then: the Business District, the college area/North Main St., Mill Village, East End and the Harricane.

The Wake Forest College Birthplace Society, the museum operators, have spent more than half a century working to keep the story of Old Wake Forest alive, collecting more than 15,000 pages of documents, 5,000 photographs, 1,000 books and hundreds of artifacts.

Today, the Calvin Jones House is part of a four-acre campus that includes gardens, pathways, an old well and a museum annex. The house is furnished to reflect the period of its various residents and the museum’s extensive exhibits depict the history of the college and town.

Follow Kristy on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, or visit her website here: Kristy Stevenson Creative.

Kids Exchange in Raleigh NCBy Kristy Stevenson; Photos courtesy of the Kids Exchange

So the New Year is here, and although it’s a bit blustery now, spring temperatures will be here before you know it! Are your kids’ closets ready for the transition? Easter dresses, swimming trunks and flip flops are right around the corner. Get what you need without breaking the bank! The Kids Exchange – Raleigh–the Greater Raleigh area’s number one consignment event–will be in full swing, Jan. 19-26, at both the Jim Graham Building and Exposition Center at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds. Select from spring and summer merchandise at bargain prices. Here are our top 10 reasons to go:

1. “Clean closets and full pockets.” Consignment is a great way for families to make some cash by selling items they no longer need. 3,000 sellers, 700 volunteers and 30,000 shoppers can’t be wrong.

2. Sellers not only get a nice return on their investment, they also get the added bonus of de-cluttering their homes, closets, playrooms and garages.

3. New online building directory (via QR code), helping shoppers search for items and exact locations. If you don’t have a smartphone or QR reader, simply print the color-coded map.

4. Diapers are expensive. But as little ones tend to grow out of sizes quickly, you can often find a variety of heiny huggers from Swaddlers to Pull-Ups.

5. Books, educational toys, puzzles and games to keep your kids busy until the warmth of the sun calls them back outdoors.

Kids Exchange in Raleigh NC6. And speaking of the outdoors, check out the selection of bicycles, sandboxes, basketball hoops, playhouses and other outdoor toys for hours of enjoyment in your own backyard.

7. Swim suits in Jan.! Where else are you going to find a selection of everything from swim diapers to one and two-piece pool attire for your toddler or teen? Then head over to the sporting goods area and check out the pool noodles, floaties and other inflatables.

8. Seeking furniture or storage options for your nursery? They’ve got you covered.

Kids Exchange in Raleigh NC9. Barcoded price tags for fast checkout.

10. Helping your community: at the end of each sale, sellers have the option of picking up unsold items or donating to a worthy cause. Kids Exchange sales around the nation have given millions of dollars to families both locally and around the world.

Kids Exchange – Raleigh is open to the public. Consignor item drop off is Jan. 19-21, volunteers shop Jan. 21, consignors shop Jan. 22 and the public sale runs Jan. 23-25 with 50 percent off most items on Sun.

Follow Kristy on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, or visit her website here: Kristy Stevenson Creative.

Holiday lights in Greater Raleigh NCBy Kristy Stevenson

During the holiday season, the Raleigh area is aglow with displays of Christmas lights, blow-ups and other seasonal presentations. Here are some of the best places for December pageantry:

Happyland Christmas Lights
5505 Huntingwood Dr., Raleigh. These lights twinkle in memory of Rick Moore (1986-2004), who in his short life always wanted “more lights.” Drive by Mon.-Thurs., 6:30-10pm; Fri.-Sun., 6-10:30pm. On Christmas Eve the lights will run sundown-10:30pm with the manger lit throughout the night. Free.

Piper Lights
5725 Fixit Shop Rd., Wake Forest. Drive through a display that connects yards and crosses a pond (creating beautiful reflections). Ride the train and visit the candy store for hot chocolate, popcorn and old-fashioned candy treats. You might even see Santa! Sun.-Thurs., 6-9pm; Fri.-Sat., 6-10:30pm. Admission is free; donations accepted.

Wendell Wonderland’s Lake Myra Christmas Lights
10 S. Cyress St., Wendell. The Town of Wendell has a spectacular light show set to music. This year’s display features 400,000 lights computer synchronized to “dance” in time to the music. The display is created by the Williams family of Wendell, who painstaking design and assemble the glowing event each year. Visitors neither walk nor ride through the exhibit–it’s more like going to the movies. You’ll park (or stand) and watch the show from the viewing area in front of the display. Each show is 30-90 minutes in length. Sun.-Thurs., 6-10pm; Fri.-Sat., 6-11pm. Admission is free; donations accepted.

Magical Winter Lights Show
Park West Village; Intersections of Chapel Hill Rd., Cary Pkwy., and Morrisville Pkwy., Morrisville. PaintScaping brings the walls of the Park West 14 Cinemas to life with 3D projection mapping and animation set to holiday music. Nightly, 6-8pm. Story time with Santa is 5:30-8:30pm, Fri.-Sun.. Plus, falling snow, train rides every night and carolers on the weekend. Free.

Neighborhoods
Some neighborhoods are known for their cumulative effort and fantastic holiday spirit–Raleigh subdivisions like Bedford, Black Horse Run and Stonehenge; the historic district of Wake Forest; and Planter’s Walk in Knightdale, for example. Check out this map of many the hot spots in the area created by Wake Forest Commissioner Jim Thompson and shared via social media.

Holiday Lights in Greater Raleigh NCWhat are some of your area favorites?

Follow Kristy on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or visit her website here: Kristy Stevenson Creative.

Wake County Libraries Annual Book Sale in Raleigh NCBy Kristy Stevenson

Calling all bibliophiles!

Want to get a really good deal on an amazing selection of reading material? The Book Sale and Festival of Reading hosted by Wake County Public Libraries, an annual event featuring more than 350,000 books for sale, is coming Dec. 11-14 to the Jim Graham Building at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh.

Wake County Libraries Annual Book Sale in Raleigh NCHours of operation and prices:

  • Thurs., 5-9pm
    Hardbound books: $4 each
    Paperback books, children’s books and CDs: $2 each
  • Fri., 9am-9pm
    Hardbound books: $4 each
    Paperback books, children’s books and CDs: $2 each
  • Sat., 9am-9pm
    Hardbound books: $2 each
    Paperback books, children’s books and CDs: $1 each
  • Sun., 9am-7pm
    Boxes of books: $5
    Bags of books: $2

Wake County Libraries Annual Book Sale in Raleigh NCSat. is the best day to go with your kids.

Sat. will feature family-friendly activities with entertainment and crafts to make the day festive and exciting for children–including a holiday magic show, “Rock Star Magic!” with Chris & Neal, family band Baron von Rumblebuss and Barefoot Juggling.

Cash, checks and credit cards are accepted for payment. It’s recommended that you bring your own bags, wagons or strollers. Boxes will be provided while they last: the customer packs.

Wake County Libraries Annual Book Sale in Raleigh NCStock up for yourself and also stuff stockings.

“It’s a wonderful opportunity for all book lovers,” said Raleigh’s Don Vaughan. He and his wife attend ever year; they collect books in a variety of genres and always go home with a huge stack in great condition. “A few years ago, I added big-time to my Edgar Rice Burroughs collection,” Vaughan said. “And you can’t beat the prices.”

“One year, I did almost all of my Christmas shopping there,” said Katie A. Gailes of Holly Springs.

All funds generated from the sale return to Wake County’s General Fund, which in turn funds services offered in Wake County agencies, schools and public libraries.

Click here for more information.

Follow Kristy Stevenson, the writer of this article, here.

It's a Wonderful Life Radio Play, Cary, N.C.The Greater Raleigh town of Cary is set to deliver packages of holiday goodness this season. Immerse yourself in holiday magic at these charming Cary events:

1. It’s a Wonderful Life Radio Play

Dec. 4-8 at the Cary Arts Center. Cary Players bring the beloved American holiday classic, It’s a Wonderful Life, to the stage as a live radio broadcast. You’ll be transported back in time at this live theatre production staged as if it includes 1940s radio stars broadcasting from a studio. Add live sound effects created on-stage by a collection of hand-crafted wind machines, miniature doors and other old-fashioned “Foley-props” and more, mix in live music and animated voices, and you’ve got a rich and wonderful production. Based on Frank Capra’s holiday classic film and recreated for the stage by Philip Grecian. Click for show times and tickets.

2. Town of Cary Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony

Dec. 6 at Cary Town Hall. For outdoor family fun, take your blanket to the always-festive, official Town of Cary Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony. The night features actors, singers and musicians, plus the unveiling of the tree with hand-crafted ornaments from more than 120 community groups. The Community Christmas Tree is a true representation of the diversity of Cary.

3. The Night Before Christmas Carol

Dec. 12 at The Cary Theater. If live theater is your style, check out The Night Before Christmas Carol from renowned Dickens scholar and author Dr. Elliot Engel and watch history, humor and the holiday come to life. Go back in time and join Charles Dickens in his study on Fri., Oct. 13, 1843. In this acclaimed performance, actor David zum Brunnen portrays Charles Dickens and 17 familiar characters; giving personal, social, and historical context to the ghostly classic, A Christmas Carol.

4. Seasonal Movies at The Cary Theater

Occurring throughout Dec. On the holiday calendar are a handful of traditional seasonal movies at The Cary Theater. From the Natalie Wood classic Miracle on 34th Street to National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, The Muppets Christmas Carol (Kids Movie Morning), Bill Murray’s Scrooged, Will Ferrell’s Elf and the children’s classic The Polar Express, directed by Robert Zemeckis, The Cary Theatre offers a heap of holiday movie big-screen showings.

And of course there are many more reasons to visit Cary in Dec. Click through to see a full list of events.

By Kristy Stevenson. Follow her here.

45th Annual Fine Designer Crafts ShowUp for a little (creative) holiday shopping over Thanksgiving weekend? Be that unpredictable gift-giver this holiday season and give truly one-of-a-kind gifts. Find unique items at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds over the Thanksgiving weekend!

Maggie Joynt Ocean Jasper BraceletMaggie Joynt’s ocean jasper bracelet

The 45th Annual Fine Designer Crafts Show, held in the Exposition Center, is a three-day show and sale of crafts including more than 115 contemporary fine craft artists from across North Carolina and the U.S. Presented by the Carolina Designer Craftsmen Guild (CDCG), this family-friendly event is a trusted resource for collectors and the community at large.

Fiber art by Jen SwearingtonFiber art by Jen Swearington

A rigorous two-step jury selection process draws emerging and career craft artists who are presenting craft at the highest level and reflecting a mastery of technique and originality of design. Show artists present a striking variety of fine crafts in glass, ceramics, wood, both wearable and decorative fibers, metal, leather, printmaking, photography and mixed media, as well as one-of-a-kind handmade furniture and both precious and semi-precious jewelry. A full list of 2014 artists and images of their work can be found here.

Pottery by Evelyn Ward
Pottery by Evelyn Ward

“Whether you are shopping for yourself or your favorite family member who loves local, hand-crafted treasures, you will always find wonderful ideas, gifts and treats,” said Amy Etheridge, CDCG executive director. “Meet, talk and mingle with the artists at their booths and ask questions about their process, path to proficiency and more.”

Artist Demonstrations:
Sat., Nov. 29, 2014

  • Roy Underhill, 1pm and 3pm
    When You Come to a Fork in the Wood – Take It!
    Host of the PBS series The Woodwright’s Shop and founder of The Woodwright’s School, Underhill explores how the deep structure of nature shapes our built environment.

Tai Kim, jewelerJewelry-a-Palooza:
Sun., Nov. 30, 2014

  • Janet Harriman, 12:15pm
    This jeweler will demonstrate folding and forming flat sheet metal into a hammered sculptural ring or bracelet.
  • Ginger Meek Allen, 1:15pm
    This metalsmith and custom studio jeweler will discuss the narrative power of jewelry, share stories of how her clients have used her work to honor their lives and demonstrate the assembly of a contemporary custom locket.
  • Ben Dyer, 2:30pm
    This designer goldsmith will share bench tips he’s mastered over his 39-year career as a studio jeweler.
  • Ginger Meek Allen, 3:45pm
    This metalsmith and custom studio jeweler will continue the assembly of a custom narrative locket while sharing tips on how to approach an artist to commission a personal piece of artwork.

Woodwork by Michael BrownWoodwork by Michael Brown

Collectible, handmade works, from artist-designed jewelry to sculptural furniture, are available in a wide price range.

Serving skilled artisans in this guild’s tradition for 45 years, the CDCG has grown to include more than 200 members from all over the Southeast and beyond. Annually culminating in a member showcase, the guild honors the skills it takes years to develop; recognizes the depth of knowledge and understanding of materials; and celebrates the individuality, uniqueness and innovation expressed by fine craft artists.

Written by Creative Genius Kristy Stevenson. You are invited to follow her online.

Carolina Ballet's The Nutcracker in RaleighOn the heels of two very successful fall productions that started Carolina Ballet’s 17th season, the company is ready to segue into the annual favorite, The Nutcracker. Thousands have been captivated and fascinated by the awe-inspiring grace, grandeur and mysterious illusions of this holiday classic.

Artistic director Robert Weiss combines the beauty of classical ballet with a little Las Vegas magic. Paired with a live symphony orchestra, The Nutcracker is an unforgettable experience for audience members of all ages.

Carolina Ballet's The Nutcracker in RaleighCarolina Ballet continues to expose audiences to traditional ballet by legendary masters and new works of contemporary choreographers. Weiss first presented The Nutcracker to area audiences in 2001 and the ballet was instantly hailed by the critics as “so imaginative and stunning that it’s for the history books.”

After 10 years, however, Weiss felt the need to spice up his production in 2011 to attract a larger audience from beyond the Greater Raleigh area. He conceived a plan to incorporate real magic into the Party Scene of Act I. He began a dialogue with premier magician/illusionist Rick Thomas, and together they devised a plan for illusions that the dancers in the role of Herr Drosselmeyer would be able to pull off like pros. “Magic so real, you’ll think you’re dreaming.”

Carolina Ballet's The Nutcracker in RaleighThey went to Las Vegas (where Thomas has a show), and for a week they took a crash course in magic. Thomas conceived the illusions Carolina Ballet presents, and Bill Smith of Magic Ventures built them. To keep The Nutcracker fresh and exciting, Weiss invited Thomas back to Raleigh this fall to introduce a new illusion into the Party Scene of the holiday classic.

Carolina Ballet's The Nutcracker in RaleighCarolina Ballet gave its production a facelift in other areas as well. Jeff A.R. Jones designed an elegant new set for the Act I Party Scene which takes place in the Stahlbaum’s house, as well as new scenery for the “Land of the Sweets” in Act II.

Despite these changes and additions, Weiss assures patrons that the choreography has not changed, saying, “the magic is only part of the experience, the glorious Tchaikovsky score played by symphony orchestra and the amazing artistry of the Carolina Ballet professional dancers combine to make this the one holiday show not to be missed.”

Carolina Ballet's The Nutcracker in RaleighMore than 130 children from area ballet schools have been chosen to fill the roles of Clara, Fritz, Party Scene children, mice and soldiers, gingerbread cookies, truffles, Arabian attendants and harlequins. Rehearsals have been underway since Sept., and the company sees many children come back year after year.

Carolina Ballet's The Nutcracker in RaleighShowing at Raleigh’s Memorial Auditorium at Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts, Dec. 19-28. Click through for show times and tickets.

Written by Creative Genius Kristy Stevenson. You are invited to follow her online.

New Magic sponsored by WRAL-TV

Photos courtesy of Chris Walt Photography

 

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